Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

You are viewing an old version of this page. View the current version.

Compare with Current View Page History

« Previous Version 10 Next »

Conference & Workshop programmes

Conference

The format of the conference will be dynamic and interactive, engaging the audience and ensuring lively and animated discussions. The opening day includes plenary sessions on e-Infrastructure for high-energy physics, digital humanities, and cloud computing, some sessions will include panel discussions.

The second and final day includes sessions on data services and technologies, and bio- and medical sciences.

Workshops

In the days before the conference, workshops on center operations, data services, science gateways, security, and services for bioinformatics will be hosted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Below you will find the programme for both the workshops held on 13 - 14 May and the conference which will run on 15 - 16 May. 

For easy viewing of the conference part you can collapse the workshop days by clicking the hexagon at the right-hand corner of the workshop day programme.

Workshop & Session descriptions

Click the show/hide icons to read more about the workshops and the sessions.

Please note that all titles are tentative

Monday, 13 May 2013
09:00 - 10:00
Arrival - Workshops - NTNU, Realfagsbygget, Høgskoleringen 5
10:00 - 11:00
LUNCH - Realfagskantinen
11:00 - 13:00
Workshop: Data Services Session chair: Damien Lecarpentier • 13:00 – 13:30: Developing Global Data Infrastructures: Trends and Requirements, Peter Wittenburg, MPI-PL, the Netherlands • 13:30 – 13:50: EUDAT: Towards a European Collaborative Data Infrastructure, Damien Lecarpentier, CSC, Finland • 13:50 – 14:10: BBMRI requirements and use of the e-Infrastructure, Roxanne M. Martinez, KI, Sweden • 14:10 – 14:30: EISCAT requirements and use of the e-Infrastructure, Mats Nylen, UMU, Sweden • 14:30 – 15:00: Panel Discussion. Moderator: Erwin Laure, KTH-PDC, Sweden
Workshop: Center Operations best practices Session chair: Bjørn Lindi The workshop is made by the HPC-centers for the HPC-centers and concerns all aspects related to the pragmatic practices of HPC, including infrastructure, services, facilities, large-scale application executions, etc. 13:00 - 13:10 Welcome 13:10 - 13:30 Building and maintaining services for Sensitive Data, Gard Thomassen. PhD,Project leader Services for Sensitive Data UiO 13:30-14:00 From Old-School to New-School Operation of HPC, Anil Thapa, Msc, MRes Team Leader - Nordic High Performance Computing (NHPC) 14:00 - 14:30 The energy cost of compressing sparse matrices for performance, Jan Christian Meyer, PhD, NTNU 14:30 -15:00 Advanced User Support in the Swedish National HPC Infrastructure Torben Rasmussen, PhD, NSC
Building and maintaining services for Sensitive Data
Gard Thomassen

Since 2009 the University Center for Information Technology (USIT) at the University of Oslo (UiO) has seen an increased demand for services for sensitive data. This is mostly data covered by the Personal Data Act §2, point 8 (religion, sex, health, union membership and prosecutions). The increased usage of video, MR--?imaging and DNA--? sequencing of humans has created an incredible need for storage and computing resources for sensitive data, by far exceeding the available resources of the classic “single offline computer dedicated to sensitive data”. To meet this demand USIT has run a project called Services For Sensitive Data (TSD) since ~2008. This project will by launching version 2.0 be offering virtual servers, storage, high performance computing and data collection within a secure environment in version 2.0. The system is based on hosting virtual research servers behind a FreeBSD 2--?factor authentication gateway. All projects are VLAN separated, and storage is provided by the new 7PB storage resource “Astrastore” at UiO. A dedicated HPC--?resource is currently being installed inside the secure environment to meet the computational needs. To enable secure data harvesting we have enabled PGP encryption of the UiO web--?questionnaire “Nettskjema”. Further, to enable time--?point studies and to identify respondents correctly we have an option of using the governmental ID--?portal. As login to the web--?questionnaire. USIT plan to offer this services to the research communities by summer 2013.

From Old-School to New-School Operation of HPC
Anil Thapa

The concept of traditional system administration of large High performance Computing operation, where all hardware is close to users and administrators, has changed in recent years.With the evolving high-speed network connection between the countries, such hardware can be hosted away from users and system administrators, which are transparent to the system. National High Performance Computing centres of Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Iceland own and have operated jointly a supercomputer in Iceland to share computational resources across country boundaries since 2011. The main objective of the joint ownership is to make the investment and cost of operation cost efficient without sacrificing service to users. The system consists of 3456 cores, 71TB storage, 7TB memory and is run by four system administrators from four different countries. Nordic High Performance Computing has set an example of an innovative concept for the HPC operation where technical administrators reside in different parts of the world and yet the HPC operation is optimal, secure and reliable. This presentation will give an overview of the project and lessons learned.

Advanced User Support in the Swedish National HPC Infrastructure
Torben Rasmussen

With the establishment of the strategic research area for e-Science in Sweden, additional funding for advanced user support was made available. Specifically, the Swedish e-Science Research Centre (SeRC) prioritized funding of a number of so-called application experts. The application experts are all affiliated with an HPC center, and the majority is affiliated with NSC and PDC, which are the centers that participate in SeRC. In this talk, I will present some of the recent history regarding application experts, as well as the coordinated efforts among the application experts. I will also present examples of work and projects performed by application experts in various scientific domains.

13:00 - 13:30
BREAK
13:30 - 15:00
Workshop: Data Services, Cont'd. Session chair: Damien Lecarpentier Session 2: National Initiatives in the Nordics • 15:15 – 15:45: TTA – National Research Data Project in Finland, Pirjo-Leena Forsström, CSC, Finland • 15:45 – 16:15: NorStore – Managing Digital Scientific Data in Norway, Andreas Jaunsen, SIGMA, Norway • 16:15 – 16:45: Research Data Initiatives in Sweden, (TBC) • 16:45 – 17:15: Panel Discussion. Moderator: Erwin Laure
Workshop: Center Operations best practices,Cont'd. Session chair: Bjørn Lindi The workshop is made by the HPC-centers for the HPC-centers and concerns all aspects related to the pragmatic practices of HPC, including infrastructure, services, facilities, large-scale application executions, etc. Preliminary agenda: 15:30-15:50 CSC: "Kajaani Data Center -case study" 15:50-16:20 met.no: Met Coop - Operational numerical weather forecast for Norway&Sweden 16:20-16:40 PDC: ScalaLife Competence Center - Providing tailored made support to the computational Life Science communities 16:40-17:00 “Design and implementation of a energy efficient high density data center”, Mattias Wadenstein, HPC2N
Kajaani Data Center - case study
Juha-Pekka Partanen

“CSC – IT Center for Science Ltd. is building one of the most eco-efficient data centers in the world. The location is Kajaani, in Northern Finland. The Kajaani Data Center is a proven solution based on technology, modern, reliable infrastructure and ecological efficiency for data needs in research and development in public and private sector. The Funet Network (Finnish University and Research Network) ensures excellent networking capabilities around the world

Meteorological Co-operation on Operational NWP (Numerical weather prediction) between Sweden and Norway
Solfrid Agersten

MetCoOp has run as a project since August 2011 with the aim to facilitate an operational organisation for the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (met.no) for production of numerical weather prediction from March 2014. The vision for the project is to deliver the best short-term weather forecast for common areas. Numerical weather forecasting is resource demanding and the quality of the forecast is important. Global models are getting better, and it is a challenge to produce better forecast on a finer grid and on shorter timescale. I will present the status of the project (what is operational numerical weather prediction about?), how it is to co-operate across the borders, share the high performance computer system and something about future plans.

ScalaLife Competence Center - Providing tailored made support to the computational Life Science communities
Rossen Apostolov

The EU funded project ScalaLife has created a cross-disciplinary Competence Centre that provides one-to-one support to HPC users (efficient usage) and developers (code analysis/profiling) of packages such as the widely used codes GROMACS and DALTON. Support is provided also to resource providers (HPC centers) with proper installation, benchmarking and second line support to users of those centers. Training events are regularly organized too. The Competence Center establishes a long-term sustainable structure and welcomes collaborations with external communities and projects

Tuesday, 14 May 2013
07:00 - 08:30
Workshop: Security I Session chair: Leif Nixon This security course targets experienced Linux administrators at Nordic academic sites. The participants will learn basic incident response and forensic skills in a virtualized environment. After an introductory lecture on field forensics and incident response, most of the day will be taken up by a tournament where the participants form teams that are given full root access to simulated HPC sites. Their task is to defend against and analyze realistic attacks of increasing sophistication, while keeping their systems up and running. The teams will be scored on their performance, and the winning team will be celebrated the most l33t admins. There may even be prizes. The maximum number of participants is 18, on a first come, first served basis.
Workshop: Science Gateways Session chair: Jacko Koster Science gateways are community-designed interfaces that provide user-friendly access to a range of services. Gateways enable researchers with a common scientific goal to use eInfrastructure resources for simulation and data analysis through a common interface, often a web portal or suite of applications. Depending on the community, gateways provide access to a variety of capabilities, including domain-specific applications, data collections, collaboration spaces, job execution, resource discovery, workflows and visualization. Science gateways can have varying goals. In general, researchers who use gateways can focus on their scientific goals and less on assembling the eInfrastructure that is required. An important goal is to make it easier for scientists to use (national) computing and storage resources, while creating and using collaborative tools for sharing data. Some gateways expose specific sets of community codes that scientists can execute, while others serve as a community portal that brings new services, data collections and applications to the community. Science gateways come in several forms and implementations. For example, they can be packaged as a web portal or as a platform with interactive visualization and workflows that allow researchers to run a (local) desktop application to access (national) compute and data services. Gateways may be available on national as well as community-specific resources and be administered by the community itself. This workshop will focus on science gateways that are used by an increasing number of Nordic researchers. The workshop will in particular address the core functions that these gateways (should) expose to the researchers, the administration that the gateways (should) hide for the researcher, and the challenges that accompany the design and implementation of gateways for optimal and friendly use of the (back-end) resources.
Reproduce and share: the key to the new generation scientific portal at UiO based on the Galaxy framework
Nikolay Vazov

Computation is entering more and more fi elds of science, it is the third scientifi c method, right next to theory and experiments. But computational tasks and resources are becoming more and more complex, moving in the opposite direction of the entry-level skills of new users. How can we bring computation to new sciences? The answer: computing portals.

08:30 - 09:00
BREAK
09:00 - 10:30
Workshop: Security II Session chair: Leif Nixon This security course targets experienced Linux administrators at Nordic academic sites. The participants will learn basic incident response and forensic skills in a virtualized environment. After an introductory lecture on field forensics and incident response, most of the day will be taken up by a tournament where the participants form teams that are given full root access to simulated HPC sites. Their task is to defend against and analyze realistic attacks of increasing sophistication, while keeping their systems up and running. The teams will be scored on their performance, and the winning team will be celebrated the most l33t admins. There may even be prizes. The maximum number of participants is 18, on a first come, first served basis.
Workshop: Science Gateways, Cont'd Session chair: Jacko Koster Science gateways are community-designed interfaces that provide user-friendly access to a range of services. Gateways enable researchers with a common scientific goal to use eInfrastructure resources for simulation and data analysis through a common interface, often a web portal or suite of applications. Depending on the community, gateways provide access to a variety of capabilities, including domain-specific applications, data collections, collaboration spaces, job execution, resource discovery, workflows and visualization. Science gateways can have varying goals. In general, researchers who use gateways can focus on their scientific goals and less on assembling the eInfrastructure that is required. An important goal is to make it easier for scientists to use (national) computing and storage resources, while creating and using collaborative tools for sharing data. Some gateways expose specific sets of community codes that scientists can execute, while others serve as a community portal that brings new services, data collections and applications to the community. Science gateways come in several forms and implementations. For example, they can be packaged as a web portal or as a platform with interactive visualization and workflows that allow researchers to run a (local) desktop application to access (national) compute and data services. Gateways may be available on national as well as community-specific resources and be administered by the community itself. This workshop will focus on science gateways that are used by an increasing number of Nordic researchers. The workshop will in particular address the core functions that these gateways (should) expose to the researchers, the administration that the gateways (should) hide for the researcher, and the challenges that accompany the design and implementation of gateways for optimal and friendly use of the (back-end) resources.
10:30 - 11:30
LUNCH
11:30 - 13:00
Workshop: Security III Session chair: Leif Nixon This security course targets experienced Linux administrators at Nordic academic sites. The participants will learn basic incident response and forensic skills in a virtualized environment. After an introductory lecture on field forensics and incident response, most of the day will be taken up by a tournament where the participants form teams that are given full root access to simulated HPC sites. Their task is to defend against and analyze realistic attacks of increasing sophistication, while keeping their systems up and running. The teams will be scored on their performance, and the winning team will be celebrated the most l33t admins. There may even be prizes. The maximum number of participants is 18, on a first come, first served basis.
Workshop: Infrastructure as a Service for the Life Sciences Session chair: Tommi Nyrönen 1.1 Lead in: Introduction to ELIXIR and IaaS for Life Science/Biomedical service providers • Nordic ELIXIR community (Bengt Persson, BILS & Uppsala) 15 min • Cloud offering for Life Science from ELIXIR FI @ CSC (Tommi Nyrönen and Jarno Laitinen, CSC) 20 min 1.2. Current scientific use cases: How ELIXIR FI cloud has been integrated to operations • ELIXIR DK Bioinformatics tools use case (Kristoffer Rapacki, CBS Technical Univ. Denmark) 20 min • Demonstration (Emil Rydza, CBS) • ELIXIR NO Bioinformatics use case (Kjell Petersen: CBU Univ. Bergen) 20 min
Ws Introduction to IaaS in Life Science in the Nordics

1.1 Lead in: Introduction to ELIXIR and IaaS for Life Science/Biomedical service providers • Nordic ELIXIR community (Bengt Persson, BILS & Uppsala) 15 min • Cloud offering for Life Science from ELIXIR FI @ CSC (Tommi Nyrönen and Jarno Laitinen, CSC) 20 min 1.2. Current scientific use cases: How ELIXIR FI cloud has been integrated to operations • ELIXIR DK Bioinformatics tools use case (Kristoffer Rapacki, CBS Technical Univ. Denmark) 20 min • Demonstration (Emil Rydza, CBS) • ELIXIR NO Bioinformatics use case (Kjell Petersen: CBU Univ. Bergen) 20 min Lead-in to Session 2. Setting up the Working session: analysis of delivering e-Infrastructure in the way outlined in the Session 1.

13:00 - 13:30
BREAK
13:30 - 15:00
Workshop: Security IV Session chair: Leif Nixon This security course targets experienced Linux administrators at Nordic academic sites. The participants will learn basic incident response and forensic skills in a virtualized environment. After an introductory lecture on field forensics and incident response, most of the day will be taken up by a tournament where the participants form teams that are given full root access to simulated HPC sites. Their task is to defend against and analyze realistic attacks of increasing sophistication, while keeping their systems up and running. The teams will be scored on their performance, and the winning team will be celebrated the most l33t admins. There may even be prizes. The maximum number of participants is 18, on a first come, first served basis.
Workshop: Infrastructure as a Service for the Life Sciences, Cont'd. Session chair: Tommi Nyrönen 2.1 Strengths and Opportunities Task: Discuss strengths and opportunities of the IaaS interplay between biomedical service providers and e-Infrastructure providers in the national and Nordic setting. Raised points can be technical! Write these on (big white sheets of) paper provided and tape them to the wall of the main room for presentation. • Choose a presenter and secretary (can be the same person) • Work in (five) groups for 15 minutes in dedicated meeting rooms • Reassemble • Present findings 5 min • Decide if the mixture of people in the groups needs to be changed 16.15 Short 5 min break, re-organise in group (rooms) 2.2. Weaknesses and proposed Actions
WS Analysis and Actions

2.1 Strengths and Opportunities Task: Discuss strengths and opportunities of the IaaS interplay between biomedical service providers and e-Infrastructure providers in the national and Nordic setting. Raised points can be technical! Write these on (big white sheets of) paper provided and tape them to the wall of the main room for presentation. • Choose a presenter and secretary (can be the same person) • Work in (five) groups for 15 minutes in dedicated meeting rooms • Reassemble • Present findings 5 min • Decide if the mixture of people in the groups needs to be changed 16.15 Short 5 min break, re-organise in group (rooms) 2.2. Weaknesses and proposed Actions Task: Summarise weak points and risks in the IaaS interplay between biomedical service providers and e-Infrastructure providers in the Nordic setting, and suggest actions to mitigate them. • Choose a presenter and secretary (can be the same person) • Work in (five) groups for 15 minutes in dedicated meeting rooms • Reassemble • Present findings 5 min followed by short discussion

17:00 - 19:00
Opening Reception - Rockheim
Wednesday, 15 May 2013
06:00 - 07:00
Conference Registration -Clarion Hotel & Congress
07:00 - 08:30
Track 1 Conference room
Opening Session Session chair: Ebba Hvannberg The opening session welcomes the participants and sets the scene for the conference. The importance of Nordic e-Infrastructure will be highlighted, as well as ways to stimulate further development of e-Infrastructures for Nordic research communities. Policy related challenges and opportunities related to e-Infrastructures will be described. E-science and opportunities provided by PRACE will be outlined, as well as future challenges, opportunities and dilemmas for PRACE and the Nordic countries. Speakers include Pål Sørgaard (Of the Norwegian Minister of Education and Research), Petter Kongshaug (UNINETT), Gudmund Høst (NeIC) and Kenneth Ruud (PRACE/University of Tromsø).
A Vision for Nordic e-Infrastructure Collaboration
Gudmund Høst

The Nordic collaboration on e-Infrastructures will be presented. The background of the collaboration will be described, as well as the current status and emerging opportunities.

Enabling excellent science through High-Performance Computing
Kenneth Ruud

By using examples from my own field of research in chemistry, from recent advances in PRACE Tier-0 projects as well as from the Scientific Case for HPC In Europe, I will demonstrate the potential for high-quality research made possible by the use of High-Performance computing. A brief discussion will also be given on the needs of scientists in terms of how HPC infrastructure is organized and utilized in terms of providing the best foundation of scientific excellence.

08:30 - 09:00
BREAK
09:00 - 10:30
Track 1 Conference room
WLCG - quo vadis? Session chair: Jacko Koster The research resulting from experiments performed in the LHC at CERN will be presented, as well as challenges and opportunities for future insights. The importance of the supporting e-Infrastructure and how it is organized through a worldwide collaboration will be highlighted and future plans for development of this e-Infrastructure will be described. The challenges and importance of contributions from national and regional centers, such as the Nordic Tier-1 will be discussed and lessons learned from the past 10 years of Nordic collaboration in this area will be pointed out. The interaction between the national, Nordic and European efforts will be a main theme and a future role of the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) will be proposed. Speakers include Steven Newhouse (EGI.eu) and Michael Grønager (Ceptacle).
NDGF - lessons learned
Michael Grønager

This talk is a tour through more than 10 years of Grids, e-Science and e-Infrastructure. What was the rationale behind NDGF and the Nordic WLCG Tier-1. What are the possibilities for broadening its success to other sciences and what are the greatest future potential in Nordic e-Infrastructure collaboration.

ATLAS Computing: status and plans
Oxana Smirnova

ATLAS experiment at LHC has been the key user of the Nordic computing and storage resources ever since NDGF came into operation. ATLAS requirements drive the development of the distributed Nordic Tier1 and Tier2 centers. This talk gives an overview of computing challenges faced by ATLAS, and plans for operations after the re-start of LHC in 2015.

EGI: Going beyond support for WLCG
Steven Newhouse

The European Grid Infrastructure was established in 2010 as a result of a community consultation to provide a sustainable model for open computing and storage in Europe based on the prototyping experiences of the previous 10 years. The presentation will provide a highlight of EGI's current activities in support of WLCG and how the experiences of the last three years of operation are informing our future plans.

10:30 - 11:30
LUNCH
11:30 - 13:00
Track 1 Conference room
Digital Humanities - A New Era? Session chair: René Belsø Researchers in humanities are increasingly using computational methods for the analysis of large cultural data sets. Digital humanities is also involved in the creation of environments and tools for producing, curating, and interacting with knowledge that is 'born digital' and lives in various digital contexts. The computational analysis of language encompasses a range of scientific disciplines, including linguistics, lexicography, and language technology. As such, computational analysis of language is an integral element of R&D in the humanities, the social sciences, and computer science. The study of human language is inherently data-driven and, in recent decades, increasingly computational and large-scale in nature. Although several e-Infrastructure challenges within the social sciences and humanities are of disciplinary nature, there are also several commonalities such as data quality, data archiving, data access and legal and ethics aspects. Solutions to these common problems may facilitate interdisciplinary cross-walks for researchers enabling creation of new insights. Speakers include Erik Champion (Aarhus University), Stefan Oepen (University of Oslo) and Hans Jørgen Marker (DASISH/Swedish National Data Service).
Tidying up the Basement: A Tale of Large-Scale Parsing on National eInfrastructure
Stephan Oepen

Language is the fabric of the Web, and language technologies arguably provide the grease for the weaving loom, evidenced for example by automated on-line translation, spoken-language interfaces to mobile devices, or the advertizing and content recommendation systems that drive monetization of Web services, and thus availability at no charge to the end user. In this presentation, I will give a high-level impression of core techniques used in a variety of language technologies, with special emphasis on their computational properties. Then I will review my own experience, and that of my research group at the University of Oslo, in migrating from operating a dedicated server farm in the basement of our department, to taking advantage of a national ‘throughput’ supercomputer, the ABEL cluster at Oslo. As a direct consequence of this happy development, the research profile of the group today is far more computation-heavy than would have been possible otherwise, and we work experimentally and empirically on a scale that would have been impossible to imagine five years ago.

Nordic Opportunities for Digital Humanities
Erik Champion

I will describe Digital Humanities, achivements in the field, curernt challenges, and opportunities for researchers in the Nordic area to work together across both Humanities and ICT.

13:00 - 13:30
BREAK
13:30 - 15:00
Track 1 Conference room
Cloud Computing - Opportunities and Challenges Session chair: Per Öster Increasingly, consumer-facing companies delivering products are adopting cloud computing. Commercial service providers are expanding their available cloud offerings to include the entire stack of IT hardware and software infrastructure. The private sector has taken advantage of these technologies to improve resource utilization, increase service responsiveness and gain in efficiency, agility and innovation. Similarly, for research communities, cloud computing holds significant potential to deliver public value by increasing operational efficiency and responding faster to emergent needs. The session will introduce some cloud computing offerings being developed by academic and commercial providers and discuss the opportunities that the cloud holds for research applications. Speakers include Anders Steinhardt (SURFnet), Vangelis Koukis (GRNet) and Janne Järvinen (TiViT/CIC).
Towards the clouds, together. Collaboration on cloud services in research and education
Andres Steijaert

Towards the Clouds, Together Collaboration on cloud services in research and education Cloud services offer the Research and Education sector huge opportunities. The cloud empowers users to select and use the services they really want, in an easy and often economically attractive manner. Cloud services offer higher education and research organisations the opportunity to become more agile and provide their users with a wider range of relevant IT services, at a faster pace. IT departments can use the instant availability and elasticity of cloud services (rapid expansion or contraction of capacity) to reduce development time and modify their expenditure profile. Thus reducing the need for periodic and large capital expenditure (CAPEX), and moving to a smoother more predictable operational expenditure (OPEX, pay-per-use model). The standard delivery of cloud services by commercial organizations however, is often incompatible with the requirements of higher education and research. There are significant challenges on trust, security, privacy, legislation and regulation. These issues have different implications between cloud services used in a private capacity, compared to services used within a research environment, where the ownership of data and the need to ensure strong custodial control are paramount. There are also issues regarding data portability and interoperability. Vendors have a commercial imperative to maintain users and reduce churn within their user base and so have little incentive to collaborate with competitors on these issues. These are cross-border phenomena which have a major impact on the research and education community. It is therefore essential that higher education and research collaborate on a European level, so that the benefits of the cloud can be fully realised and the attendant risks are fully understood and appropriately managed. By presenting a united front, the R&E community can work to guide and influence cloud service providers in these areas. This presentation will highlight how these risks can be mitigated and managed through a coordinated approach and implementation of a range of Best Practices across the community. In addition, through developing a range of procurement guidelines, collaboration can reduce the learning curve for brokering these services and minimise duplication of standards and policies. About GÉANT As the pan-European data network dedicated to the research and education community, GÉANT connects 40 million users to the internet. Through its innovative access and authentication services of eduroam and eduGAIN, GÉANT has long experience in the fields of user access services and federated service authentication and delivery. In GÉANT, 34 National Research and Education Network organizations collaborate on the cloud and address topics like cloud strategy, standards, interoperability, privacy and security, cloud brokerage and procurement, vendor management and integration. The presenter will share how GÉANT supports higher education and research on both a strategic and practical level to: • Get a better understanding of the full range of cloud computing solutions and their capabilities and limitations. • Incorporate cloud activities in their roadmaps and portfolios including developing service models for access to brokered services. • Facilitate their user-base in adopting the cloud with the right conditions of use, through development of a range of Campus Best Practice guidelines. The audience will be invited to comment on these initiatives and relate these to the situation in their institution. Attendees will learn about the tools, instruments, and the approach to help their institute respond to and benefit from the cloud. The presenter will reserve ample time for discussion to gather input for the joint European cloud activities in GÉANT.

~okeanos and Synnefo: The public cloud service and the open source software that powers it
Vangelis Koukis

This talk will introduce Synnefo, a complete open source cloud platform. Synnefo powers GRNET's ~okeanos public cloud service, an IaaS cloud delivering advanced compute, network and storage services to the Greek research and academic community, since 2011. The talk will cover our experiences with building and running a large-scale production public cloud, focusing on: * Open source vs. commercial software in building a large-scale, production cloud infrastructure * Building on commodity hardware vs. vendor solutions * Current open source solutions * Identifying the building blocks of an IaaS cloud, and re-using existing opensource components wherever possible * Why Synnefo? * General Synnefo architecture, software components used * Running robust, fault-tolerant VMs without a Storage Area Network * Using a content-addressable file storage service as the Image repository * Unified storage of files, VM Images and live VM disks, independently of the backend storage technology * Thin VM provisioning, with zero data copy and live VM migration * Current Industry and Open Source Community use cases of Synnefo * Production readiness/Scalability/Maintainability on commodity hardware

17:00 - 20:00
Dinner- Clarion Hotel & Congress
Thursday, 16 May 2013
07:00 - 08:30
Track 1 Conference room
Data Services and Technologies Session chair: Gudmund Høst Over the next decade, the amount of data in the world will increase with a factor of 50 while the number of IT professionals will grow with a factor of less than 1.5. Smart e-Infrastructures provide the tools for creating the added value from these data, as well as the technologies for implementing appropriate security and data protection policies. Openness and sharing of data allows value creation in terms of new knowledge, products, and ideas through re-using, re-purposing or computing of data. The general principle of open science is now being embraced by a growing number of funding agencies worldwide, including the European Commission. National and international approaches for provisioning of data services and proposed future directions will be described. The underlying technological challenges for the data storage layer will be presented and the potential added value for scaling up to Nordic or international levels will be discussed. The challenges for international research infrastructures will be presented through an example from the Nordic region. Speakers include Andrew Treolar (ANDS, keynote), Ian McRae (EISCAT), Gerd Behrmann (NeIC/NORDUnet) and Andreas Jaunsen (NorStore/UNINETT Sigma).
What business are we in? Data-centric research, service requirements and national responses
Andrew Treloar

This presentation will first consider the underlying driver (yes, just one!) for e-Research infrastructure. It will then look at the changing nature of research and research communication. The kinds of services that are needed to support this will be surveyed, and the presentation will conclude by examining how one might provide these at a national or regional level.

Future e-Infrastructure Requirements for the EISCAT facilities
Ian McCrea

The EISCAT_3D project: Data and processing challenges and implications for Nordic e-infrastructure Ian McCrea: STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK The EISCAT_3D project (www.eiscat3d.se) will be a large, distributed research infrastructure located in the Nordic region, with facilities in Norway, Sweden and Finland. EISCAT_3D will be a new type of radar facility for studies of the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space, replacing the current generation of dish-based EISCAT radars by a network of phased array antenna fields, offering considerably greater performance in terms of power, resolution and experimental flexibility. Realising such a system, however, presents several challenges, not least of which is the fact that the system will produce several orders of magnitude more data than the present radars. In order to extract the optimum performance, these data will need to be combined and processed in real-time, requiring the provision of significant computing and data transport capabilities to relatively remote locations. In this talk, we will briefly review the current design of the EISCAT_3D system, with a particular emphasis on the computing and networking requirements at each data processing level and how the various challenges are likely to be resolved. In the light of this, we will consider the potential implications for e-infrastructure provision in the Nordic region, in particular with regard to networking and long-term data storage.

Nordic Storage Opportunities
Gerd Behrmann

Challenges in shared storage resources for large scale e-science projects are highlighted by exploring the differences of two common storage solutions found in different communities, dCache and iRods. Is there common ground? Are they exclusive? Is there even a need?

A national archive for digital research data
Andreas Jaunsen

The objective of the NorStore initiative is to develop and operate a persistent, nationally coordinated infrastructure that provides non-trivial data services to a broad range of scientific disciplines. The key to achieving this is to describe and share the data. Discovery of data is facilitated by providing open access to meta-data. The launch of a national research data archive is one important step in this direction. The retrieval of restricted and public data is provided via autonomous technologies. The challenges and lessons learned will be discussed with a view that similar requirements among the Nordics exist and the link to initiatives like EUDAT.

EUDAT - Towards a Collaborative Data Infrastructure - A Nordic Perspective?
Damien Lecarpentier

EUDAT is a new pan-European data initiative bringing together a unique consortium of 25 partners, including research communities, national data and high performance computing (HPC) centers, technology providers, and funding agencies from 13 countries. EUDAT aims to build a sustainable cross-disciplinary and cross-national data infrastructure providing a set of shared services to access and preserve research data. The talk will provide an overview of the status and plans of the project and highlight the contribution of the Nordic partners as well as possible opportunities for engaging further Nordic communities in this pan-European initiative.

08:30 - 09:00
BREAK
09:00 - 10:30
Track 1 Conference room
Closing Plenary Session chair: Bjørn Lindi The Nordic countries are active in area of bioinformatics. This area is a key element in contemporary life science, from medicine, over the environment to industrial biotechnology. Many of the state-of-the-art data analysis methods and algorithms are developed in the Nordics, adding considerable visibility to this region. Furthermore, a number of large life science investments have been made recently in the Nordic countries. The Nordic countries have taken pivotal roles in European infrastructures within the bio- and medical sciences. The session will point to the frontiers of research within the area and point to directions for Nordic e-Infrastructure development aimed at bioinformatics and life sciences. Speakers include Tommy Nyrönen (CSC) and Erik Lindahl (Stockholm University).
10:30 - 12:00
LUNCH

  • No labels